The Expert’s Ear: Expertise And Aesthetic Judgments

“The first time I listened to Pinkerton, Weezer’s second studio album, I hated it. And so did almost everyone else. Rolling Stone readers ranked it as the third worst album in 1996. Writing for Entertainment Weekly Jeff Gordinier compared it to “a collection of get-down party anthems for agoraphobics.” Reacting to a wave of negative reviews the lead singer of Weezer, Rivers Cuomo, confessed that Pinkerton is a “hideous record.” A few years later something changed. In 2002, Rolling Stone readers – the same readers that said Pinkerton was the third worst album in 1996 – voted it the 16th greatest album of all time. In 2004 Rolling Stone re-reviewed the album and gave it five stars. A 2010 “Deluxe Edition” reissue of Pinkerton claimed a perfect score of 100 on MetaCritic.com. Pitchfork likewise gave it a perfect 10.0. Today, Pinkerton is one of my favorites. What, exactly, changed?”

Group thought? Interesting look at how experts and novices view art (and design).

The Expert’s Ear: Expertise And Aesthetic Judgments

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From Scientific America

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This Is Your Brain on Disney

“Researchers have suggested that Disney generates a successful experience because our brains are responsive and receptive to art, creativity, storytelling, humor, wit, music, fantasy, and morality, all of which may have been important to social development—and feature heavily in the “Disney experience” in a rather amplified way.”

A great case study in using psychology in design.

This Is Your Brain on Disney

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If there were a celebrity among brain chemicals, it would be dopamine. Supposedly released whenever we experience something pleasurable, it’s forever linked to salacious stories of sex, drugs and wild partying in the popular press.

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Predictably irrational. Some great psychology in there and some application in design. Worth a lunchtime watch.

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What Pricing Strategy Beats Discounts?

At the grimy end of psychology & design.

What Pricing Strategy Beats Discounts?

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The Behavioural Design Lab is a is a new initiative from the UK Design Council and Warwick Business School.

It’s all about Big Psychology, setting direction and encouraging big behavioural shifts. It’s good to see design as an industry start to tackle some big ideas. Looking forward to seeing some actual design.

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The silent signals of body language. If you’ve read the book you’ll know this is where it all started for me.
(via Silent Signals | Psychology Today)

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How memory works or 10 things most people get wrong about memory

A great introduction to memory from PsyBlog:

How Memory Works: 10 Things Most People Get Wrong

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Left Brain / Right Brain Myth

I’ve never been a fan of management & other pseudo psychology and the the left brain / right brain rubbish that is out there drives me mad.

Back in 1987 this was a myth. Fast forward 25 years and it’s still a myth.

Here’s the abstract from the paper:

[This paper ] reviews research on the functional differences between the 2 hemispheres of the human brain and finds that such claims represent a hemisphere mythology that is contradicted by research on the nature of the differences between the hemispheres.

Let me say it again, there is no evidence that difference between the left/right sides of the brain has any effect on behaviour. It’s a myth, a fallacy. Designers you are not left brained any more than developers are right brained.

In fact the length of our fingers is better indicator of behaviour.

From Left brain/right brain mythology and implications for management and training. Terence Hines (1987)
JSTOR: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Oct., 1987), pp. 600-606 (Requires free registration to read).

Here’s an example of the myth in action from Mercedes Benz:

image

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