Showing an image of the brain in an article means we rate it’s credibility higher

brain scan

Brain images are believed to have a particularly persuasive influence on the public perception of research on cognition. Three experiments are reported showing that presenting brain images with articles summarizing cognitive neuroscience research resulted in higher ratings of scientific reasoning for arguments made in those articles, as compared to articles accompanied by bar graphs, a topographical map of brain activation, or no image.

Scary stuff, are we really that gullible?

Original study: Seeing is believing: The effect of brain images

Image credit

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Decision making depends on when you last had a break

A graph showing the time of the day (bottom) against the likelihood of parole being given by a judge. It’s quite telling and it’s really easy to spot lunch.

Time to design an adaptive interface that is easier to use just before lunch…

Source: Justice is served, but more so after lunch: how food-breaks sway the decisions of judges – Not Exactly Rocket Science

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How the sense of an ending shapes memory

Composers, novelists and film directors try to end on a high. Restaurants keen to manipulate their online reviews have found a similar trick.

Source: Tim Harford — Article — How the sense of an ending shapes memory

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How Technology Hijacks People’s Minds — from a Magician and Google’s Design Ethicist 

A great piece on ethics, psychology and digital design.

I’m an expert on how technology hijacks our psychological vulnerabilities. That’s why I spent the last three years as Google’s Design Ethicist caring about how to design things in a way that defends a billion people’s minds from getting hijacked.

Source: How Technology Hijacks People’s Minds — from a Magician and Google’s Design Ethicist — Medium

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Improve Your Designs With Gestalt Psychology

Jon Hensley looks at real-world examples to illustrate psychology principles in use so that you can begin to use them in your own designs.

Source: Improve Your Designs With The Principles Of Similarity And Proximity (Part 1) – Smashing Magazine

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Cognitive Biases That Could Be Helping You Make Bad Decisions or the evil side of Psychology

Source: Twenty Cognitive Biases That Could Be Helping You Make Bad Decisions | IFLScience

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Beware of neuro-bunk

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Dissecting the Tricks Built Into New York’s Balthazar Resturant Menu

The psychology of menu design is the psychology of design and best of all the restaurant environment is pretty controlled so we can measure the results. Here’s some more psychology based design tips from menu design.

Source: Author William Poundstone Dissects the Marketing Tricks Built Into Balthazar’s Menu — New York Magazine

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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens

A good, in-depth look at the psychology of reading

E-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as such technologies improve, but research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages

Source: The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens – Scientific American

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The Brain: A neural network built entirely in Quartz Composer

A basic AI algorithm. Very neat.

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